I Love it When Technical Book Authors Have a Sense of Humor

I am going through Pro ASP.NET MVC 3 Framework by Adam Freeman and Steven Sanderson (@StevenSanderson) (Apress). Enjoying it so far – good technical writing, good level of detail mixed with useful examples of different implementation options.

And most importantly, they have a good sense of humor. From Page 381 (my highlights):

Quote from Pro ASP.NET MVC 3 (Sanderson & Freeman), page 381

If you don’t want to click on the link, they are talking about best practices for url schemas using MVC, and give an example of a link to Amazon as something not to do (I realize the irony of my linking to Amazon above). They then include in an aside:

Note To be very clear, we have only the highest respect for Amazon, who sells more of our books than everyone else combined. We know for a fact that each and every member of the Amazon team is a strikingly intelligent and beautiful person. Not one of them would be so petty as to stop selling our books over something so minor as criticism of their URL format. We love amazon. We adore Amazon. We just wish they would fix their URLs

.Another good one: The authors are talking about using MVC to create a REST API, where the same action name in a given controller can be overridden to handle HTTP Get/Post/Delete requests (page 476, my emphasis):

Now each StaffMember entity in our application can be uniquely addressed using a URL of the form Staff/123, and a client can use the GET, POST, and DELETE HTTP methods to perform operations on those addresses. This is called a RESTful API, except by people who claim to be experts in REST, who will tell you that nothing is truly RESTful except their own code. (We joke—sort of).

Gotta love it.

Platypus

Take greasemonkey to the next level with platypus. From the site:

Platypus is a Firefox extension which lets you modify a Web page from your browser — “What You See Is What You Get” — and then save those changes as a Greasemonkey script so that they’ll be repeated the next time you visit the page. Editing pages to suit your needs is dandy — but making those changes “permanent” is the real payoff.

Some of the things you can do with Platypus include:

  • Remove parts of the page you don’t wish to see.
  • Move a part of the page to a different location.
  • Change the style and format of page elements.
  • Modify all the links on the page using a regular expression.
  • Insert your own HTML code.

For those of us (myself included) who have not taken the time to learn how to compose a greasemonkey script, here is an easy to use took that will do it for you.

Google Traffic

Well, it’s not put out by Google. But it uses their maps and is pretty cool (I can see the interface getting much slicker in a few months). This is the way that the web is going – more integration of different related technologies across different sites to create more useful overall tools.

Cool greasemonkey scripts that I am using

As I find start to use new ones, I’ll post them here

Also, if you want to know more about developing on greasemonkey, then dive into greasemonkey (.org).