Google Translating Search Queries on the Fly

The most popular post on this blog, by far, is Where Does Google Chrome Store User History, Profile and Bookmarks. I had the good luck to be the first person on the Internet to post an answer to this question (even before Google did so in their documentation), just a few days into the original Chrome Beta release. The vast majority of hits come from Google searches that include one or more of the following keywords: Chrome, History, Profile, Bookmarks, Cookies, Save. I mention this because I saw something very interesting in my site stats today. Someone got to this page by searching for "שמירת סימניות בכרום". This is Hebrew for "Save Bookmarks in Chrome". If you searched for this term in English you would see a link to my post on the subject somewhere in the range of the 5th-10th link. However, they searched in Hebrew, and even so, a link to this post showed up (number 8 in the results when I tried it). So they must be taking the Hebrew, and while they are processing results in Hebrew, the search algorithm also translates it on the fly, searches on the term translated into English, and integrates relevant English results into the result set. This is very cool, and in a world where the bulk of technical literature and answers to questions like this are in English, it is very smart. There is a good chance that someone searching for this in Hebrew will still find an answer in English to be useful. Looks like the Google Search team still has a few tricks up their collective sleeve.
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